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Month: January 2018

Rubbish to Published: Picking your audience and genre – Writing Stream Recap

Last stream we continued our Rubbish to Published series, where we start from absolutely nothing and create something “publishable.”

We’d created our “idea toolbox” in the previous stream, so this time we took the next step: picking out audience and genre.

To start off we talked about the different: (1) story types, (2) audiences, and (3) genres. You can see what we came up with here:

Rubbish to Published: Creating your idea toolbox – Writing Stream Recap

Last stream we continued our Rubbish to Published series, where we start from absolutely nothing and create something “publishable.”

We’d already come up with our story idea in the previous stream, so this time we took the next step: creating an idea toolbox.

An idea toolbox is basically a bunch of brainstorming. You come up with lots and lots of ideas by following these steps:

#1. Ask a question about your story idea
#2. Write whatever answers pop into your head (you can have multiple, even contradictory answers!)
#3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 until you have about a page full of information
#4. Read through your page and pick out the parts that “spark emotion,” things that get you excited to write
#5. Compile all your favorite parts together, then go back to step 1

As always, chat came up with some great questions and answers based on the idea we came up with. Here’s where we finally ended up:

Rubbish to Published: 4 ways to come up with a story idea – Writing Stream Recap

With the last stream we started a new series called Rubbish to Published. As requested by the chat, we’ll go along step by step with the process of coming up with a story idea, fleshing it out, and actually writing it to the point of being “publishable.”

And what better way to start than by discussing how to come up with a story idea?

Today we went over four ways to come up with a story idea: (1) a “what if…?” (2) an image, (3) a character, and (4) something/someone from your life.

After taking about each method in detail, we opened it up to the chat for suggestions in each category. Here’s the great stuff everyone came up with:

Vegan mom turns kids to life of ice cream crime – Writing Stream Recap

For the latest stream we went back to one of our favorite writing exercises: randomly-generated sentences.

They’re a perfect way to work out your creativity muscles, and worst comes to worst, if your story sucks, hey, you can just blame the terrible random sentences!

Chat voted between three random sentences to start our story, and we wrote about half a page. Then we got another random sentence and had to use it as the next sentence in our story. Then we wrote another half a page and got a final random sentence, which would be our ending sentence that we had to write to.

Needless to say, it was pretty chaotic. But thanks to some awesome suggestions from chat, I absolutely love where our story ended up.

You can read it here: (the randomly-generated sentences are in bold)

Writing Stream Recap: Ca$hing in on $EQUEL$

Since today was special guest Abbey’s last day to join the stream for a while, we decided to make it special.

Instead of writing a new story, we looked over all of the stories we’d written over the past two weeks and narrowed it down to the three we liked best. Then we held a vote in the chat to see which one we would write a sequel to.

The three choices were these:

#1. Christmas curse
#2. Dragon kidnaps a prince by mistake
#3. Hamurai the hamster samurai

In the end, the winner was…

Writing Stream Recap: Confronting your inner child

For the last writing stream (along with special guest Abbey), we tried something new.

For our writing exercise, we used the Japanese “Poop Kanji Book” to get some random sentences. In the book, every Japanese character (kanji) is given three example sentences that uses it, each of which (of course) involves poop.

After getting a random page number, we opened to the page with the kanji for “corner.” The chat voted on which of the three poop-sentences would start our story, and this is what we wrote: (bold sentence was our “random” sentence)

Writing Stream Recap: Hamster Samurai

Over the past couple streams, whenever we browsed the Writing Prompts Subreddit, lots of people in chat would suggest even better ideas for prompts than the ones we were choosing from.

So for our most recent stream (with special guest Abbey), we decided to go ahead and create our own writing prompt, and then write it.

To help with that, we came up with a formula for creating a good prompt: normal idea plus twist equals prompt. For example, robots take over the world (normal idea) plus ducks (the twist) equal the prompt: “A.I. robots have taken over the world but have formed a pact with one species: ducks.”

This was a good exercise not only to come up with a prompt, but also for any story you want to write. We’ve all read sci-fi adventures, time travel mishaps, and romance drama novels before, so having a good twist to hook the reader can really make your story stand out.

After coming up with a bunch of fun prompts, we narrowed it down to these three:

Writing Stream Recap: Cinderella’s Gay Grandson

Our last stream (with special guest Abbey) was on New Year’s Day, so we decided to ham it up as our theme and use it as our muse.

For our first writing exercise, we started off with a vote for the chat to pick which New Year’s topic we should write about (“a New Year’s Eve party” won), and we got a randomly-generated sentence to begin it with.

It was probably the hardest opening sentence we’ve had yet, but I’m happy with where it ended up. You can read what we wrote here: (the bold sentence is the randomly-generated sentence we had to start with)

Happy New Year!

In Japan it’s considered good luck to have a dream involving a hawk, eggplant, or Mt. Fuji for your hatsu-yume (first dream of the new year).

But if you have a dream about me gobbling as a cooked turkey, well, that will bring you a different kind of luck.

Happy New Year’s everyone!

Featured image: Gahag