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Tag: funny

Vegan mom turns kids to life of ice cream crime – Writing Stream Recap

For the latest stream we went back to one of our favorite writing exercises: randomly-generated sentences.

They’re a perfect way to work out your creativity muscles, and worst comes to worst, if your story sucks, hey, you can just blame the terrible random sentences!

Chat voted between three random sentences to start our story, and we wrote about half a page. Then we got another random sentence and had to use it as the next sentence in our story. Then we wrote another half a page and got a final random sentence, which would be our ending sentence that we had to write to.

Needless to say, it was pretty chaotic. But thanks to some awesome suggestions from chat, I absolutely love where our story ended up.

You can read it here: (the randomly-generated sentences are in bold)

Writing Stream Recap: Hamster Samurai

Over the past couple streams, whenever we browsed the Writing Prompts Subreddit, lots of people in chat would suggest even better ideas for prompts than the ones we were choosing from.

So for our most recent stream (with special guest Abbey), we decided to go ahead and create our own writing prompt, and then write it.

To help with that, we came up with a formula for creating a good prompt: normal idea plus twist equals prompt. For example, robots take over the world (normal idea) plus ducks (the twist) equal the prompt: “A.I. robots have taken over the world but have formed a pact with one species: ducks.”

This was a good exercise not only to come up with a prompt, but also for any story you want to write. We’ve all read sci-fi adventures, time travel mishaps, and romance drama novels before, so having a good twist to hook the reader can really make your story stand out.

After coming up with a bunch of fun prompts, we narrowed it down to these three:

Writing Stream Recap: Cinderella’s Gay Grandson

Our last stream (with special guest Abbey) was on New Year’s Day, so we decided to ham it up as our theme and use it as our muse.

For our first writing exercise, we started off with a vote for the chat to pick which New Year’s topic we should write about (“a New Year’s Eve party” won), and we got a randomly-generated sentence to begin it with.

It was probably the hardest opening sentence we’ve had yet, but I’m happy with where it ended up. You can read what we wrote here: (the bold sentence is the randomly-generated sentence we had to start with)

Happy New Year!

In Japan it’s considered good luck to have a dream involving a hawk, eggplant, or Mt. Fuji for your hatsu-yume (first dream of the new year).

But if you have a dream about me gobbling as a cooked turkey, well, that will bring you a different kind of luck.

Happy New Year’s everyone!

Featured image: Gahag

Writing Stream Recap: Ugh, stupid Christmas magic

Well Christmas is over, so that means it’s time to write about the harsh, sobering realities of the season that we wake up to with a hangover the day after Christmas.

For our writing exercise last stream (along with my special guest Abbey), we gave the chat five “miserable Christmas happenings” to choose from, and “drunk uncle” won by a hair. After brainstorming a bunch of ways we could write about a drunk uncle, we went with the most interesting one: writing from the drunk uncle’s point of view.

Here’s what we wrote:

Writing Stream Recap: Building snow-women and squirrel Christmas

Since our last stream was on Christmas, what better way to celebrate than by writing our own cheesy Hallmark Channel Christmas movie?

And of course, there’s an auto-generator for that!

Here’s what we got for our roll-your-eyes-but-you’ll-probably-watch-it-anyway Christmas movie plot: “The protagonist is an out-of-work actor who is forced to move back in with their parents. The love interest is a snowman magically brought to life. They work together to throw the demanding mayor’s massive holiday party (and fall in love in the process).”

Needless to say, this plot excited me. After getting some suggestions and votes from the chat, we were off. Here’s what we wrote:

Merry Christmas!

Christmas may just be another day in Japan — in fact it’s the only day kids have to go to school this week before winter break, which is kind of funny.

But that doesn’t mean we can’t celebrate with the same awkward family small talk, stomach pains from overeating cookies, and unwrapping what you think is going to be a Nintendo Switch but ends up being a Nentondo Swotch that your grandma got for you from Chinatown!

If you’re looking for holiday cheer, well, then maybe Google it. But if you’re looking for how Japanese people celebrate Christmas over here, then hey! I’ve got you covered.

Featured image: Pakutaso (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)

Writing Stream Recap: Dreaming about pregnant Harry Potter

Last writing stream certainly brought out some, uh, creative stories!

We started off with a writing exercise where we got a random word, and used it as our topic (our word was “contact”). Then we get five more random words and had to use them at some point in the story. Because nothing quite gets the creative juices flowing like having to connect seemingly-unrelated ideas.

After writing three different opening sentences and the chat picking the one they liked best, this is what I wrote (bolded words are the random words).

Happy Thanksgiving!

We might not have much turkey in Japan, but we’ve still got plenty of awkward get-togethers, naps, and smelly leftovers that you eat anyway.

Enjoy the stuffing, everyone!

Japanese company tries to create motivational poster, accidentally creates demotivational poster

My pick for the SoraNews24 article this week is the depressing: Japanese company tries to create motivational poster, accidentally creates demotivational poster.

Sometimes the way Japan comes up with solutions to problems is hilariously sad. Nobody having children? Let’s have meetings until all hours of the night and discuss ways to fix it. Want students to all have “natural” hair color? Force the ones with naturally not-black hair to dye it black.

And here we have another example. When upper management is displeased with how their subordinates handle the last-minute changes that they demand, how do they fix it? By looking into themselves and seeing what they can do to create a better environment for the workers who look up to them?

Nah, just blame the young people!

Take a look for yourself by reading the article here, and at least take solace that most Japanese people found it as sad as we did.

Top image: Twitter/@katokato