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Scott Writes Stuff Posts

Foreigners misreading Japanese kanji of “two men one woman” is too pure for Japanese Internet

My pick for the SoraNews24 article this week is something that a lot of Japanese-language learners can probably relate with: Foreigners misreading Japanese kanji of “two men one woman” is too pure for Japanese Internet.

Anyone who’s studied Japanese before has probably tried to “sound out” kanji before, that is, attempting to read a kanji you’ve never seen before by deducing its meaning through the parts that make it up. Sometimes they can make sense (“person” plus “tree” equals “rest”) but more often than not they don’t (“sun” plus “sound” equals “darkness???”).

And when misreadings occur because of assumptions, they can have hilarious results, just like the example in this article. I won’t spoil what the Japanese-learner read the kanji composed of “man-woman-man” as, but let’s just say it’s pretty far from the actual Japanese definition.

Read it and find out for yourself here!

Top image: PAKUTASO (edited by SoraNews24)

Japanese Twitter can’t stop laughing at this JLPT listening question straight out of Evangelion

My pick for the SoraNews24 article this week is the article that I had a one-in-a-million connection with: Japanese Twitter can’t stop laughing at this JLPT listening question straight out of Evangelion.

A few days ago I was looking around the Japanese Internet, seeing if there was an article I could do. I stumbled upon a tweet of someone showing off a listening question from a past JLPT test that was basically taken from the anime Evangelion.

That sounded really familiar, in fact a little too familiar, so I did a little searching and saw that the test was administered in December 2009, the date when I took the test myself! I remember how that question (which was completely out of place on the test, the rest of which was 100% SAT-like serious) made the entire class burst out laughing.

I couldn’t believe how lucky I was to be have taken the same level test on the same day in the same year, so I took it as a sign and had to write the article with my own personal perspective. Check it out here.

Featured image: PAKUTASO

Japanese Internet can’t agree on what to call this color, what do you think it is?

My pick for the SoraNews24 article this week is the pupil-perplexing: Japanese Internet can’t agree on what to call this color, what do you think it is?

Color differences between languages and cultures has always fascinated me. Sometimes the colors that we use to refer to every day things (like grass, the sky, or apples) can vary slightly between languages. Maybe in another language the grass isn’t green, but “blue,” or maybe apples aren’t red, but “orange.”

It’s something that we take for granted, and then when it gets challenged, can be quite jarring. And if you want to see a great example of another culture having a problem with a color that you may not think is so difficult, be sure to check this article out.

Nintendo releases official, free online PDF of EarthBound player’s guide for anyone to read

My pick for the SoraNews24 article this week is the nostalgia-inducing: Nintendo releases official, free online PDF of EarthBound player’s guide for anyone to read.

EarthBound on the Super Nintendo was not only my favorite video game as a kid, it still is my favorite game to this day. And now with the release of the SNES Classic, even more people get to relive playing it, or try it themselves for the first time.

And to make it even better, Nintendo put up PDFs of all the SNES Classic games’ instruction manuals on their website. But since EarthBound never had an instruction manual, we get the entire strategy guide — over one hundred pages of gorgeous artwork, hilarious writeups, and of course, info on the game.

This isn’t your typical strategy guide. The EarthBound strategy guide is a legitimate work of literature, which may sound weird to hear about a video game guide, but it’s true. Why? Well check out the article and find out for yourself.

Featured image: Nintendo

Hole-y crap! Instagram makeup artist Mimi Choi transforms her face into surreal works of art 【Pics】

My pick for the SoraNews24 article this week is the terrifyingly amazing: Hole-y crap! Instagram makeup artist Mimi Choi transforms her face into surreal works of art 【Pics】.

I’m not usually one to get excited about makeup pictures, even the ones that are out of the ordinary, but these hole-in-the-face photos from Mimi Choi literally made me gasp out loud.

I don’t want to give any more away, so really just prepare to be blown away and check out the article here.

 

Featured image: Instagram/mimles

Kim Jong-un’s “little red book” of quotes is the worst joke book you can buy for 500 yen

My pick for the SoraNews24 article this week is the emotionally-confusing: Kim Jong-un’s “little red book” of quotes is the worst joke book you can buy for 500 yen.

Everyone knows about the Little Red Book of quotes put out by the Chinese leader Mao Zedong. And now it seems that North Korean leader Kim Jong-un is not going to be outdone by his tyrant predecessor, creating his own “little red book” with nearly double the number of quotes.

While we didn’t get to see all of of the quotes in this Japanese translation, I think we get more than enough.

Want to see what goes on inside Kim Jong-un’s head? Then give the article a read here!

Featured image: Twitter/@huruya2100

How to Make a Horcrux: Deducing the “Horrible” Act

I recently re-read all seven Harry Potter books to see if my opinion of them had changed in the past decade. I’d always loved the first four, but could never quite get into the last three. They felt like they were missing the magic (wop wop) that the first four had.

And this time around too, unfortunately I didn’t like Order of the Phoenix, Half-Blood Prince, or Deathly Hallows much more than I had the first time I’d read them. Although there was one thing I did enjoy more about them this time: Voldemort’s Horcruxes.

They were certainly a lot more interesting
than the “mystery” of who the Half-Blood Prince was.

In my opinion, the Horcruxes are the best parts of the sixth and seventh books. Up until their reveal, we never knew how Voldemort survived being hit by the killing curse. Learning that he used actual, concrete magic to do it, rather than just ambiguous magic like “magical willpower” or “the impermanence of evil” gives the stories more depth and makes them feel more real.

But one thing struck me as odd. Even though we learn all about Horcruxes in books six and seven, we never learn one of the most obvious things about them: how do you make one? Yes, we know you need to commit a murder, thereby “splitting” your soul, and then put that “split” part into a container, but there’s more to it than that.

“Death room” cleanup employee makes “beautiful” replicas of terrifying rooms people died alone in

My pick for the SoraNews24 article this week is the spine-tingling: “Death room” cleanup employee makes “beautiful” replicas of terrifying rooms people died alone in.

Dying alone is a fear that many people have which has always puzzled me. But now, having seen these intricately-crafted dioramas of “death rooms” from people who died alone in Japan, I can understand it a lot better.

What makes these dioramas so haunting isn’t just how horrifying they are, or how well-crafted they are right down to the brands of garbage in the rooms, but it’s the fact that they’re all real. Each and every one of them was experienced by the artist herself, who works for a “death room” cleanup company.

Seeing these made me realize how lucky I am, and I hope the same goes for you too.

Featured image: Twitter/@kamba_ryosuke

Many Japanese workers told by workplaces during missile scare: “Please come to work as usual”

My pick for the SoraNews24 article this week is the groan-worthy: Many Japanese workers told by workplaces during missile scare: “Please come to work as usual.”

Earlier this week when North Korea shot a missile over northern Japan, many Japanese people were alerted via an automated government message on their phones to take immediate shelter. Shortly after, a few others received another message… from their workplace telling them to get to work already.

Reading the e-mails that were sent to people, and listening to their reactions online, is pretty amazing. The worst part is everyone nearly unanimously agreed that taking shelter and being a little late for work (but potentially saving their lives in the event of another missile or something), was worth it… but they all still went to work on time anyway.

It’s a bit of a culture shock for sure, but at the same time we should ask ourselves: would we have done anything different in our country?

Featured image: PAKUTASO

New Japanese augmented-reality service lets you meet with deceased loved ones at their graves

My pick for the SoraNews24 article this week is a glimpse into the future of cyberpunk death: New Japanese augmented-reality service lets you meet with deceased loved ones at their graves.

The service allows you to pick any place in the world, and visit your deceased loved ones there via augmented reality on your smartphone (like Pokémon GO). And if they’re currently alive, they can record videos of themselves talking and interacting with you too, making the “visit” even more realistic when the time comes.

Honestly I’m surprised that this hasn’t been done yet, and I expect it will become much more mainstream. The current generation will probably be much more inclined toward being preserved digitally instead of rotting away in an overpriced box in the ground.

Featured image: PR Times