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Scott Writes Stuff Posts

Sticking cheeseburgers through soft drink straws now a thing on Japanese Instagram 【Pics】

My pick for the SoraNews24 article this week is this confusing culinary delight: Sticking cheeseburgers through soft drink straws now a thing on Japanese Instagram 【Pics】.

When I first saw this popping up on Japanese sites, I immediately knew I wanted to write about it. It’s just so bizarre, but also so simple that anyone could do it themselves. Not that I could really see why anyone would want to.

There’s so many questions here: Aren’t the burger bits stuck in the straw gross? How do you get the burger through the straw in the first place? Do you push the straw through it? Then how do you line the straw back up into the drink? Maybe you slam the burger like you’re impaling it through a spike? But doesn’t that make a mess? And, of course, what are the advantages of doing this at all?!

If you’re a brave soul willing to try this yourself, I’d love to hear some answers.

Featured image: Instagram/im_mmoe

Flight attendants help man transporting wife’s ashes, move Japanese Twitter to tears

Since W.T.F. Japan is no longer a weekly series but a whenever-I-have-an-idea-that-I-think-you’ll-like series, I’ll instead use my weekly SoraNews24 update to pick the favorite of my own articles from the past week.

This week’s favorite article is “Flight attendants help man transporting wife’s ashes, move Japanese Twitter to tears.”

As soon as I saw this article on the Japanese source site, I immediately thought of one of my most popular articles: “Japanese dad teaches daughter how to handle alcohol, has Twitter in tears.” It’s been a while since I’ve have a chance to do an “emotional story translation” article, and this one really hit me in the gut when I read it in that special kind of way that makes you want to smile and cry at the same time.

I really enjoy writing articles like these because they bring something from the Japanese side of the internet to the English-speaking side that probably would’ve never made it over without some help. As a translator, it makes me happy to give new life to a story just by changing the language the words are written in, even if it is just a Twitter photo of a short magazine editorial.

Featured/top image via GAHAG (edited by me)

W.T.F. Japan: One year anniversary special! Top 5 W.T.F. Japan articles 【Weird Top Five】

This week for my SoraNews24 W.T.F. Japan article, I wrote about the top five W.T.F. Japan articles.

Wow, has it really been a year already? I wasn’t sure how long the W.T.F. series would last when I first started it, but people really liked it, and now, one year later, it’s fun taking a look at which articles were liked the most.

Honestly the popularity of some of the articles on this list was a complete surprise. Maybe I should take them as hints for what to write more of…?

 

Either way, make sure you’ve seen the best W.T.F. Japan had to offer this year by clicking below!

Read the article here.

W.T.F. Japan: Top 5 kanji with ironic meanings 【Weird Top Five】

This week for my SoraNews24 W.T.F. Japan article, I wrote about the top five kanji with ironic meanings.

In English, words can be broken down into smaller parts. For example, “biology” is “bio” (meaning “life”) plus “ology” (meaning “the study of”). The same thing goes for Japanese too, and sometimes you can even break down the kanji themselves to figure out how their parts come together to give their meaning.

Except sometimes, when you look at the individual parts of a kanji under a microscope, they don’t really come together in the way you’d expect. In fact, they might even end up giving you the complete opposite meaning that the kanji actually has!

Who are the worst of these “ironic kanji” offenders? Only one way to find out!

Read the article here.

W.T.F. Japan: Top 5 Japanese foods for people who don’t like seafood 【Weird Top Five】

This week for my SoraNews24 W.T.F. Japan article, I wrote about the top five Japanese foods for people who don’t like seafood.

Pretty much every time I tell someone that I live in Japan, one of their first comments is something along the lines of: “Oh you must enjoy such great food! Fresh fish, sushi, sounds like heaven!”

And it would be… if I liked any of those foods.

Unfortunately I’ve just never liked seafood, and when I first came to Japan I was worried that I’d have to live on a diet of nothing but vegetables.

Of course that’s not the case, and since I’ve been here I’ve found that there is a whole beautiful rainbow of Japanese food that has never been anywhere near the ocean.

So to help any others out there like me, here’s a list of great, authentic Japanese food you can get while in the country, broken down by restaurant type from easiest to hardest. Good luck, fellow unfortunate picky eaters!

 

Read the article here.

W.T.F. Japan: Top 5 odd ways Japanese people beat the summer heat 【Weird Top Five】

This week for my SoraNews24 W.T.F. Japan article, I wrote about the top five odd ways Japanese people beat the summer heat.

Summer in Japan can be brutal. With high temperatures and high humidity, if you’re used to more mild summers then you may find yourself surprised when you’re covered in sweat after just walking to the local convenience store.

But thankfully the Japanese people have adapted to these sometimes-brutal temperatures with a variety of interesting methods. Some of them are similar to things done in other parts of the world, but others are in a complete league of their own.

Which ones are the craziest? Only one way to find out!

Read the article here.

W.T.F. Japan: Top 5 reasons Japanese squat toilets are awesome 【Weird Top Five】

This week for my SoraNews24 W.T.F. Japan article, I wrote about the top five reasons Japanese squat toilets are awesome.

While the entirely article is written somewhat tongue-in-cheekly, Japanese-style squat toilets do have a lot of benefits to them. Would I be willing to give up my comfortable sit-down toilet because of them? Probably not, but it’s a lot closer than it may seem.

Whether you’ve never seen a “squat toilet” before, or if you’re well-acquainted with this different take on a bathroom break, you might learn something new

Read the article here.

W.T.F. Japan: Top 5 most confusing Japanese compound words【Weird Top Five】

This week for my SoraNews24 W.T.F. Japan article, I wrote about the top five most confusing Japanese compound words.

Just like in English, many words in Japanese are made up of putting two words/prefixes/suffixes together. For example, “biology” is the “ology” (study) of “bio” (life), and in Japanese seibutsugaku is the gaku (study) of seibutsu (living things).

Most of the time, the compound words make sense like that. But sometimes, they can mix together in strange and mysterious ways that make no sense at first glance.

What are five of the most confusing ones? Well I’m glad you asked!

Read the article here.

W.T.F. Japan: Top 5 hardest Japanese habits to break 【Weird Top Five】

This week for my SoraNews24 W.T.F. Japan article, I wrote about the top five hardest Japanese habits to break.

It wasn’t until I wrote this article that I realized just how many of my habits were actually things I picked up while in Japan. I’d just thought they’d been a part of me for my entire life… nope! Japan tricked me into doing them.

I can’t really say much more without spoiling what those habits are, so go ahead and give the article a read!

Read the article here.

W.T.F. Japan: Top 5 nicest sounds in Japan【Weird Top Five】

This week for my SoraNews24 W.T.F. Japan article, I wrote about the top five nicest sounds in Japan.

A few months back I did the top five most annoying sounds in Japan, but since this country has more than its fair share of pleasant sounds too, I felt like it was only fair to devote an article to those as well.

When most people who have never been to Japan think of “Japanese sounds,” they might imagine gongs or chopsticks against bowls or karate wails and grunts. But the actual day-today soundscape of Japan is so different than that, and so different from what you’re probably used to in your home country.

It can be hard to imagine living in a place surrounded by unfamiliar sounds, but you quickly get used to them, and then when you go home, suddenly realize that you miss them just as much as the people and places you visited while there.

Read the article here.